Bonanza <3

Finnish Aviation Academy Beechcraft Bonanza OH-BBK.

Finnish Aviation Academy Beechcraft Bonanza OH-BBK.

Take-off. Power set. Sixty. Rotate (75 kt). Positive – gear up. And we’re off with Bonanza. What a fun plane to fly!

Getting ready for the first Bonanza flight. Jusa handling the fuel.

Getting ready for the first Bonanza flight. Jusa pumping fuel.

This week the long-awaited happened. I flew the Bonanza two times. It was pretty awesome. I had my two remaining differential training flights for Bonanza. The first one was in traffic circuit. I did landings with different flap settings as well as a low approach and a spot landing. To refresh your memory and inform the unaware, a spot landing is a practise for a forced landing when the engine is out. You pull the power idle and then land without power. The first thing to do is to reach the best gliding speed, which for Bonanza is 110 kt (204 km/h). The spot landing with Bonanza is pretty wild. It comes down quickly, nose down and fast.

Hop on the wing, let's go.

Hop on the wing, let’s go.

Ready! Jusa's first flight.

Ready! Jusa’s first flight.

The second Bonanza flight included maneuvering in the training area. We did turns, slow flight, stalls, climbs, descents, and got to see and try how the plane flies. It’s such a fun plane to fly! It was quite cool to see and feel how it slows down when the landing gear is extended. It feels like a real (big) airplane already! One pretty cool thing we did – we descended at the rate of 1000 ft/min and did 180-degree turns. Whenever we would reach the opposite direction we would turn the other way and turn until we’re heading to opposite direction and then turn again, and at same time we were coming down fast. The speed was close to 190 kt (350 km/h) going down. Such a fun maneuver. These two flights were flown in VFR and from now on we’ll fly IFR with Bonanza. It’ll be great to perform all the stuff we’ve learned in the trainer with the real thing. The first IR training flight is next week.

As an observer in the backseat for the second flight. The others are getting ready for their first.

As an observer in the backseat for the second flight. The others are getting ready for their first.

Antti making turns.

Antti making turns. I’m just enjoying the ride.

Lake Pyhäjärvi in the distance and river Kokemäenjoki.

Lake Pyhäjärvi in the distance and river Kokemäenjoki.

Antti landing on runway 12.

Antti landing on runway 12.

I finally managed to start my PIC hour building. But not without some problems. First my plane needed some maintenance so my booking was cut short. Then some of the guys got stuck on an airfield nearby because they couldn’t get back to Pori due to bad weather. My plane was one of the planes that got stuck there. This event actually turned out to be fun in the end, but at first I was quite disappointed to realize another one of my bookings would be cut short. So the next day I rode with Ville in a Cessna to Eura airfield to get my plane. It was fun to ride with another student because we don’t normally get to fly with each other in a Cessna. He dropped me off there and I flew my plane back to Pori. I was unable to execute my original plans for the day, but got a nice experience! The third PIC booking got cancelled due to very strong winds on Friday. No hope there, winds were forecasted to gust 35 kt (18 m/s) in Pori. At least I got to fly some, better luck next week!

Ready for the plane rescue mission. Runway 30.

Ready for the plane rescue mission. Runway 30.

Pori airport. A great opportunity for pictures when someone else is flying.

Pori airport. A great opportunity for pictures when someone else is flying.

A VOR, which I often talk about. This one is PRI (Pori).

A VOR, which I often talk about. This one is PRI (Pori).

Ville as my pilot. Good times.

Ville as my pilot. Good times.

Approaching Eura.

Approaching Eura.

Close to touchdown. Weather is nice!

Close to touchdown. Weather is nice!

Advertisements

11 responses to “Bonanza <3

  1. Your mention of the rotation speed at the opening of this post reminded me of a Cessna 150 I flew for a while. On take off, at rotation speed, I would feel a slight bump in the yoke. I could not figure out why it was doing that until I finally realized that what I was feeling in the yoke was the air flow attaching to the wing and creating work in the form of lift. It was as if the aircraft was telling me “OK sport, we’re ready now, do it”. So as I would add some back pressure on the yoke and the nose wheel came off the ground, I could hear Mr. Bernoulli from somewhere on high laughing and singing “I told you so, I told you so”.
    Bob Cloud

  2. Hi Niina. When is the start of the next application process for the FAA? And exactly how long from when the applications open is it until the start of training? I am considering the FAA for my studies but it seems like there is so long between the intakes of new students that if I don’t get in, it’s a lot of time wasted. What were your experiences? I’ve read your first posts and they mention you first started applying in 2011? Is that correct?

    • Hi Brandon, sorry for taking a while to reply. I was on holiday when you first wrote. Yes, I started applying in the fall of 2011. The application process is quite long, it lasts from the fall until spring. The first students start the following summer. The next ones about 6 months from that and so on. I started in the second patch, the following winter. I don’t consider the application process time wasted. It is time going after your dreams, how could it be wasted time? Also, it doesn’t stop you from doing other things or trying out other options at the same time. And, there is no way of getting in without applying. :)

      • Oh I see.
        How many people were selected for each of the two groups? I totally agree, I think I may have not made myself clear. I meant that since the application process takes a long time, if I applied and didn’t get accepted, being from Australia that’s a big risk. It would mean I have to wait another two years to re apply :(

      • Nowadays about 80 people are chosen and they start in four groups, every 6 months. By the way, are you aware of the requirement of good command of Finnish?

  3. Ok! That sounds like more of an intimate way of learning. Yes I have read that on their website, it’s the reason i’ve been learning Finnish. I’m actually visiting a friend in Oulu in August for two weeks! :) Do you believe it’s possible that I can know the language and become accepted? Are there any foreigners there?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s