Cross-country with Bonanza

On the way to Jyväskylä.

On the way to Jyväskylä.

These past weeks have been fun flying cross-country flights in the Bonanza. I finally got to land at Helsinki airport too! We have also finished the synthetic training and are almost done with Bonanza too! Things have been moving quickly and it’s a little sad that the last Bonanza flight is just a moment away. I am nearly done with PIC hour-building too. All this means that summer holiday is approaching fast.

Me getting ready to fly.

Me getting ready to fly.

Since the last post I’ve flown five cross-country flights in a Bonanza and visited Jyväskylä (EFJY), Tampere-Pirkkala (EFTP), Vaasa (EFVA), Turku (EFTU), Mariehamn (EFMA), some more than once, and last but not least Helsinki (EFHK).

Me posing with the mighty Bonanza.

Me posing with the mighty Bonanza.

The first cross-countries included the en-route part as well as some extra approaches which we did either at the departure airport or the destination depending on the leg each student flew. We flew some of these flights with three students and usually did a triangle trip. It was nice to have some company in the backseat. Some of the flights included a touch-and-go at one airport and after that the next en-route part to the destination. This way we got to practise approaches as well as other things like getting a clearance and activating the flight plan for the next leg and switching flight plans on the GPS. All this teaches you to always think ahead and organize and time your work in the flight deck so that you are always able to navigate and fly correctly.

Tuomo approaching Jyväskylä via initial approach route.

Tuomo approaching Jyväskylä via initial approach route.

Tuomo making an approach to Jyväskylä runway 30.

Tuomo making an approach to Jyväskylä runway 30.

On the way to Jyväskylä we encountered some icing in cloud, which forced us to descend to a lower altitude. A thin white line of ice building on the horizontal stabilizer can be seen in the picture.

On the way to Jyväskylä and back we encountered some icing in cloud, which forced us to descend to a lower altitude. A thin white line of ice on the horizontal stabilizer can be seen in the picture.

Bonanza longing to the sky in Jyväskylä.

Bonanza longing to the sky in Jyväskylä.

Over Tampere.

Over Tampere.

Juho making a PAR approach. I also got to do a PAR when I flew from EFJY to EFTP. It was a great experience.

Juho making a PAR approach at EFTP. I also got to do a PAR when I flew from EFJY to EFTP. It was a fun and rare experience.

EFTP PAR approach plate.

EFTP PAR approach plate.

Me dreaming in the backseat on our way from Tampere to Pori.

Me dreaming in the backseat on our way from Tampere to Pori.

Tuomo doing the same.

Tuomo doing the same.

Crazy-looking clouds on the way back.

Crazy-looking clouds on the way back.

Aleksi ready to fly us to Mariehamn.

Aleksi ready to fly us to Mariehamn.

After a climb from cloudy Pori the sun was shining.

After a climb from cloudy Pori the sky was blue. The advantages of IFR.

We left the clouds behind on the coast.

We left the clouds behind on the coast.

Beautiful Finnish archipelago.

The beautiful Finnish archipelago.

Aleksi making a visual approach to Mariehamn.

Aleksi making a visual approach to Mariehamn.

"Runway in sight. Ready for visual."

“Runway in sight. Ready for visual.”

At destination.

At destination.

At EFMA with Aleksi.

At EFMA with Aleksi.

It was a rush hour and the tax free was open!

It was rush hour and the tax free shop was open!

Bonanza basking in the evening sun at the home base.

Bonanza basking in the evening sun at the home base.

Easily the most memorable flight was the trip to Helsinki. It’s one of those milestones I have thought about while advancing on my training as well as something I’ve dreamed about by the EFHK runways for so many years. I took off from Pori and headed first towards Turku. There I did a touch-and-go and then was off to Helsinki. I was really excited! Leaving Turku the ATC (air traffic control) first tells you to contact the ACC (area control center) Tampere radar. Especially when flying to Helsinki it is good to tell the ACC whether you are able to follow the standard arrival routes or not. The Bonanza doesn’t have what is called a PRNAV (precision RNAV) approval and therefore we tell them “negative PRNAV”. This lets them know that once we enter Helsinki airspace we will need radar vectoring. That is when the ATC gives you headings to fly. It’s actually quite easy, you just do what they tell you to.

Moving on, the next order was: “O-BK, contact Helsinki radar 129.850.” Here we go. “Helsinki radar, OH-BBK, information TANGO, BE36, maintaining flight level 70.” Radar guided me towards runway 04R and then handed me over to Helsinki arrival. “Helsinki arrival, OH-BBK.” The arrival then gave me vectors to guide me to intercept the localizer for the ILS approach for runway 04R. Then finally “O-BK, turn left heading 070, cleared ILS approach runway 04 right, QNH1019, report when established on localizer.” “Turn left heading 070, cleared ILS approach runway 04 right, QNH1019, wilco, O-BK.” Then a while later: “O-BK, contact tower 118.6.” “118.6, O-BK.” “Terve Helsinki tower, OH-BBK, runway 04 right.” “Terve O-BK, wind (something like 070 degrees 6 knots), cleared to land runway 04 right.” “Cleared to land, runway 04 right, O-BK.” This was such an amazing moment! There it was in front of me. Cleared to land. Moving!

Landed on runway 04R in Helsinki!

Landed on runway 04R in Helsinki!

Hello Helsinki!

Hello Helsinki! Taxiing on ZULU.

Coming in to Helsinki we do a high speed approach. This is so we don’t slow down the other faster traffic too much. When normally we set flaps for approach and select gear down when the glideslope is moving (in an ILS approach) and slow down from 140 knots to 100 knots, in a high speed approach we keep the speed at 150 knots and set the flaps for approach a little later and select the gear down only at 4 miles from touchdown. Only then we slow down to 100 kts and then aim at 80 knots over threshold.

After I landed and got to the exit, I contacted Helsinki ground. There are many specific instructions at EFHK, one of them relates to landing on runways 22L, 04R, 33 or 15, and it is that you should contact Helsinki ground right after vacating the runway unless otherwise instructed. In the other two cases you stay on tower frequency. “O-BK, taxi to stand 314 via ZULU ALFADELTA.” “Taxi to stand 314 via ZULU ALFADELTA, O-BK.” And then I was asked to expedite taxiing because there was an AirBaltic 737 landing behind me and it was going to vacate the runway via the following exit. I needed to get out of the way or else would have to wait. I managed to speed up and even got thanked for it! Found my way to our stand and job well done! Exhilarating! Now it was time to enjoy a fellow student fly us back via Tampere-Pirkkala.

Here comes AirBaltic..

Here comes AirBaltic..

Made it!

Made it!

Helsinki tower.

Helsinki tower.

Taxiing on ALFADELTA past gate 22.

Taxiing on ALFADELTA past gate 22.

Happy in Helsinki with Sampo!

Happy in Helsinki with Sampo!

Leaving business apron taxiing past UPS 767.

Leaving business apron taxiing past an UPS 767 N318UP. Me now enjoying in the backseat.

Sampo lining up runway 04R.

Sampo lining up runway 04R.

Leaving EFHK, until next time!

Leaving EFHK, until next time!

After a touch-and-go at EFTP, heading back to Pori.

After a touch-and-go at EFTP, heading back to Pori.

Some cumulus forming on the way to Pori.

Some cumulus forming on the way to Pori. Sampo as pilot.

The last cross-country flight was a progress check. It was supposed to be as close to a normal en-route flying as possible. I flew us back to Pori from Jyväskylä. It was a nice flight and we received shortcuts both on the way there and on the way back. I have enjoyed these cross-country flights tremendously and I hope to do them much more in the future!

Another beautiful morning to fly.

Another beautiful morning to fly.

Getting ready for another trip.

Getting ready for another trip. Heading to Jyväskylä again.

This time Ville as the pilot.

This time Ville as the pilot.

Iikka and Sampo pushing their aircraft. It's not light!

Iikka and Sampo pushing their aircraft. It’s not light!

Ville inserting a flight plan to the GPS.

Ville inserting a flight plan to the GPS.

On the way to Jyväskylä the left side looked like this..

On the way to Jyväskylä the left side looked like this..

..the right side looked a bit different. A weather front bordered our route in the distance.

..the right side looked a bit different. A weather front bordered our route in the distance.

I have two more Bonanza flights left before my checkride. Some of us start with checkrides already this week. Mine is probably next week. It’s a little bit exciting, but hey it’s just another flight right?!

Advertisements

5 responses to “Cross-country with Bonanza

  1. Congratulations! Must have been pretty exciting to ‘live’ your dream! Like the trousers with the charts, very practical 😀😀😉. At what FL have you been flying on these flights?

  2. It was fun looking over your shoulder at that Jep PAR chart. The FAA charts I use for training don’t have PAR diagrams. It’s only a section at the front of the book that lists minimum altitudes available at a few airports. Because most of our airports don’t have radar services, the radar approach is flown once, if ever, during a special cross country flight lesson. Interesting differences!

    • We have radar available mostly where and when we fly, but the PARs are only available at a few places, mainly where the Air Force operates. Fortunate for us we have one of those places only 30 minutes away, EFTP.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s